This Is The Low-Maintenance Hair Colour Technique French Women Go Wild For


wu meijie Date:2021-09-18 16:05:48 From:vogue
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As a nation of French fangirls, we’re forever on the hunt for clues as to how they shop, dress and apply their skincare. As for that grown-out, beachy-looking hair colour so many Parisians wear so well? It comes, says hairstylist and L’Oréal’s UK editorial ambassador Adam Reed, courtesy of the French balayage blonde technique.

 

As a nation of French fangirls, we’re forever on the hunt for clues as to how they shop, dress and apply their skincare. As for that grown-out, beachy-looking hair colour so many Parisians wear so well? It comes, says hairstylist and L’Oréal’s UK editorial ambassador Adam Reed, courtesy of the French balayage blonde technique.

 

Hair Colour

 

The French balayage technique involves painting the colour onto hair freehand and blending to create the optimal balance between light and dark. Often, colourists will paint lighter colours around the face – the so-called “money pieces” favoured by famous faces from Hailey Bieber to Rosie Huntington-Whiteley – to brighten and illuminate the skin. Meanwhile darker tones are used to create dimension in the hair, without ever looking unnatural. When the hair is examined, the shifts in shade are typically so imperceptible that it looks like it just grew that way – in other words, exactly as it should.

 

The technique has become so popular, along with “root stretching”, a method that sees natural root colour blended out to create a natural-looking balayage effect, that L’Oréal now offers a French Balayage service in salons to create the look, while other hairdressers are reporting increased demand for subtle balayage.

 

Domenico Casella, senior stylist at Mayfair’s Neville Hair & Beauty, witnessed an uptick in women asking for natural-looking hair colour over the summer. His clients want “low-maintenance looks that are bespoke to them”, he says. “Graduation of colour that goes lighter towards the tips of the hair, as well as nice face framing strands.” Casella delivers the desired effect using the “shatush” method: “It’s freehand and highlights only the hair that would otherwise be sun-kissed,” he explains. “Applying the colour using my hands [as opposed to a brush] enables me to place the colour delicately. It’s extremely soft and the results subtle, so it’s ideal for those wishing to add dimension to their hair with very little maintenance required.”

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